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The USBC Open Championships will make its fifth trip to Syracuse, New York, in 2018, and first visit this century. The event also has called Salt City home in 1935, 1958, 1973 and 1999.

The 2018 event will be held at the Oncenter Convention Center, which also hosted the 1999 Open Championships.

With the world's largest participatory sporting event visiting Syracuse every other decade, the tournament has grown and evolved in many ways with each visit.

This page will showcase the look and feel of the Open Championships during its exciting runs over the years in Syracuse as we also look forward to the next chapter in tournament history in 2018.

1999
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The Mass Ball Shot has been a longstanding tradition at the Open Championships as a part of the opening-day festivities. The Oncenter is one of the rare venues that gets to experience this moment more than once. The convention center also hosted the 2011 USBC Women's Championships.

1973
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Team photos have been a part of the Open Championships since 1941, and here's a team getting ready for theirs at the 1973 event. Don't miss out on the great artwork featuring Rip Van Winkle!

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Here's the facade of the Onondaga County War Memorial, the home of the 1973 event. The venue still is located across the street from the Oncenter and is home of the Syracuse Crunch of the American Hockey League.

1958
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The Onondaga County War Memorial also hosted the 1958 Open Championships. Check out the crowd ready to check out the action at the 55th Open Championships!

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This photo of the leaderboard includes the final standings for the 1958 event. The members of Falstaff Beer of St. Louis captured two titles as they won Regular Team and Team All-Events. Edward Shay of Philadelphia posted the 15th perfect game in tournament history to conclude his singles event and capture the title with a 733 series.

1935
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Talk about a sight in Syracuse. The attire has changed, automatic pinsetters were 22 years away and automatic scoring took 44 years to make its debut, but this photo symbolizes the championship atmosphere bowlers have come to expect at the Open Championships.